On 11 December at the University of Auckland, Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga – New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence and Whakauae Research for Māori Health & Development presented the results of the 2017 project - Cultural, Ethical, Research, Legal & Scientific (CERLS) Issues of Rongoā Māori Research. The output of this research project is a set of Rongoā Māori research guidelines.
 

Sir Tīpene O'Regan chaired his final Board meeting of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) last week. After 12 years of leading the Board and guiding NPM, Sir Tīpene will conclude his tenure at year end.
 
Sir Tīpene arrived at NPM in August 2006 having led the Ngāi Tahu Waitangi Tribunal and Treaty settlement claims process. He was an architect of the Treaty Fisheries Settlements, had been founding chair of Te Ohu Kaimoana, Assistant Vice Chancellor Māori at the University of Canterbury and a long serving Chair of the Ngāi Tahu Māori Trust Board.
 

On Friday 16th November, we farewelled 100s of delegates who had gathered for Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga's 8 continuous days of Indigenous celebration and research excellence of our 8th Biennial International Indigenous Research Conference.
 
Indigenous students, community and tertiary researchers and policy makers from around the world connected in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland once again, for focused knowledge sharing on the potential of our Indigenous futures.
Amongst twenty new Fellows and three Honorary Fellows recently elected to the Academy of the Royal Society Te Apārangi for their distinction in research and advancement of science, technology and the humanities were NPM Co-Director Professor Waimarie Nikora and Principal Investigator Professor Angus Macfarlane.
 
Professor Angus Macfarlane (University of Canterbury)

The successful 2018 Marsden Fund recipients have been announced from across the country and this year the list includes many past and present NPM researchers working as Principal Investigators and Associate Investigators on a number of new, engaging and exciting projects.

The Marsden Fund grants support New Zealand’s best investigator-initiated research in the areas of science, engineering, maths, social sciences and the humanities and it is important that research borne out of matauranga Māori has been recognised and celebrated this year.

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