News

Renowned Central American literary expert and scholar Professor Arturo Arias will dispel myths surrounding the Maya Calendar, and address wider issues for indigenous cultures in a public lecture Tuesday 12th March.

On 21st December 2012, Maya communities in the Americas celebrated the end of the Fourth Era and welcomed the Oxlajuj B’aqtun, the Fifth Maya Era. However across the planet, from the US to Russia, people panicked at the idea that the world would end “as predicted by Maya astronomers”.

In new research published this week, Associate Professor Rāpata Wiri argues the concept of mana whenua is being deliberately misinterpreted by certain large iwi for their own commercial gain whilst disenfranchising smaller but significant iwi in the Central North Island (CNI).

The findings are in the latest issue of AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, published by Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga.

To watch a video of this hui, click here

Professor Charles Royal will conduct a joint discussion with Professor Arturo Arias and other artists and writers on the theme “Truth and Narrative". In the academic environment there is increasing pressure to deny the truth-value of storytelling and to privilege quantitative or measurable truth over narrative ways of knowing. The focus here will be on the transformative potential of Indigenous creativity that reveals truth through various forms.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga and The New Zealand Centre for Latin American Studies present a public lecture by Professor Arturo Arias, from University of Texas at Austin.

Māori scholar Dr Melinda Webber (Ngāti Whakaue, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Hau) from The University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education will share her unique knowledge of Aotearoa’s school communities with American counterparts at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay later this month, with the help of a Fulbright-Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) Travel Award.

The first Horizons of Insight Seminar for 2013 was Professor Charles Royal speaking on “Creative Potential” – the vision and concept underpinning the strategy of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga. If you missed this seminar, click here to watch the video.

Several Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) researchers were recognised in the Marae Investigates Ngā Toa Whakaihuwaka (Māori of the Year) 2012 awards, as people who have uplifted the mana of Māori in 2012. The special show aired on Waitangi Day 2013 on TVNZ.

“Whatukura: a computer based model of the human eye” is a long term research project in which Dr Jason Turuwhenua and his research team are aiming to produce optically and biomechanically functional computer eye models. Through such modelling he expects to increase our understanding of the eye and its diseases, and hopes to provide enhanced clinical diagnostics and interactions with patients.

Professor Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and Associate Professor Linda Waimarie Nikora lead the Tangi Research Programme at the University of Waikato. The researchers are committed to studying tangi, conscious of the belief that such work in itself carries the inherent risk of "karanga aitua" or calling down misfortune by drawing attention to it. Contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand is constantly influenced by tangi practice, through the popular media and through personal exposure; elements of tangi engage people every day.

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