Mauri Ora - Human Flourishing

Dr Kahu McClintock

Waikato/Tainui, Ngāti Mutunga, Ngāti Porou
Manager Research
Te Rau Matatini

Kahu is the Manager Research at Te Rau Matatini. Kahu has worked in the health and disability sector for over 20 years, with a special focus on Māori health research and child and adolescent mental health.

Kahu holds a Dip Nursing (Psychiatric), Higher Dip Teaching, B Ed, M Phil (Māori), D Phil (Psychiatry). She was a Member of the Māori Health Committee, New Zealand Health Research Council from 2008 to 2014, and Chair of Ngā Kanohi Kitea Community Research Committee, New Zealand Health Research Council during that term, She is the lead for Te Rā o Te Waka Hourua

Veronica Tawhai

Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Uepohatu
Lecturer - Te Putahi-a-To
Massey University

Ms Tawhai lectures in policy and politics at Te Pūtahi a Toi. A recent recipient of the Fulbright-Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga scholar award, Ms Tawhai's fields of research and community work include the Treaty of Waitangi, Māori and youth political engagement, constitutional change, and electoral, civics and citizenship education. 

Professor John Broughton

Ngāi Tahu, Ngati Kahungunu Ki Heretaunga
Professor: Preventive and Social Medicine and Oral Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences
University of Otago

John is responsible for the integration of Hauora Māori/oranga niho in the curriculum of the undergraduate Bachelor of Dental Surgery and the Bachelor of Oral Health. John is also the director of the Ngai Tahu Maori Research Unit within the Centre for Hauora Māori.  The Unit was established in 1996 as a partnership between Te Runanga O Ngai Tahu and the Dunedin School of Medicine.

Associate Professor Joanne Baxter

Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Mamoe, Waitaha
Associate Dean (Māori) and Associate Professor of Māori Health
Dunedin School of Medicine - University of Otago

Joanne is a public health medicine specialist with research interests in Māori health workforce development, Māori mental health, Māori child and youth health, hazardous drinking among tertiary students and health inequalities.

Joanne has current research collaborations with the Injury Prevention Research Unit (Hazardous drinking project) and the New Zealand Mental Health Epidemiology Survey team.

Associate Professor Jo Smith

School of English, Film, Theatre and Media Studies

Jo's research examines the socio-political power of media technologies with a primary focus on how colonial histories inform contemporary media practices. She has developed her research profile across three interrelated fields (Indigenous, Postcolonial, and Settler Colonial Studies) to ask new questions about the ways in which media technologies, institutions and aesthetic practices help shape notions of identity, nationhood and community.

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