• Project commenced:

    We don’t have many Māori or Pacific Engineers and we need them. The University of Auckland’s Engineering degree programme is challenging and lists Level 3 Mathematics with Calculus as a compulsory prerequisite for consideration to enter. It has become common practice for secondary schools to stream by ability (for Mathematics) as early as Year 9 and continue this practice through to Year 13, Level 3. This means that placement in the highest ability groups throughout secondary school are necessary to study Level 3 Mathematics with Calculus.

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    Māori are increasingly taking on environmental management roles (often on a voluntary basis) that juggle the responsibilities of both traditional networks and government regulations. The focus of this scoping project was to identify the barriers, obstacles and potential solutions to conducting research in the area of local customary fisheries from a flax roots level, that is the application and management of Mataitai and Taiapure by communities and marae.
     

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    Māori are increasingly taking on environmental management roles (often on a voluntary basis) that juggle the responsibilities of both traditional networks and government regulations. The focus of this scoping project was to identify the barriers, obstacles and potential solutions to conducting research in the area of local customary fisheries from a flax roots level, that is the application and management of Mataitai and Taiapure by communities and marae.
     

  • Project commenced:

    People living in isolated communities often live in homes that lack essential amenities such as clean reliable water, energy or power sources, vehicle access, telecommunications and waste management systems. Under these circumstances the health and safety of whānau, in particular the most vulnerable (kaumātua and pēpi) can be compromised and placed at risk.
    This research involved interviewing whānau who reside in isolated communities and determining the essential needs of whānau (from their perspective) and the factors taken into consideration by whānau to prioritise these needs.

  • Project commenced:

    This project involved gathering and mapping the whakapapa kōrero of four land, river, coastal pathways in the rohe of Ngāti Apa. The researchers worked with four whānau to research and identify old walkways or travel paths.

  • Project commenced:

    This research was a community action research project dedicated to identifying ways in which to advance Te Reo
    Māori within the homes of Ngāi Te Rangi whānau. The research team worked with whānau to develop strategies for ‘learning interventions’ that can operate within the community, and within the home. The results indicate that increasing language in the home depends on more inter-whānau relationships, inter-whānau dynamics and intra-personal dynamics then it does on language course history, language inputs or even the process of language acquisition itself.

  • Project commenced:

    The Ahuriri or Napier Estuary is of significant value to both tangata whenua and the Hawke’s Bay community as a whole. Historical and current environmental pressures, together with some questionable management processes over the years, had caused an almost total cultural disconnection between the tangata whenua and the estuary.
     

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    This study on the nature of privilege sheds light on how those with the least advantage are positioned to seem as though they are receiving ‘special benefits’, while unearned advantages that accrue to the privileged remain invisible and unscrutinised, particularly by those that benefit the most from them. Participants’ constructions of privilege emphasise the multi-faceted complexity and discursive ambiguities of the ways in which the concept is utilised within our political economy to account for disparity and covertly reproduce the status quo of Pakeha advantage.

  • Project commenced:

    There is emerging awareness among Māori that mātauranga Māori and Māori values have an important part to play in papakāinga design as well as in modern urban planning and settlement design. This research project, based on a number of hui, a Māori research collective, dialogue with policy and planning professionals, collaborative learning, case studies and a review of literature, shows that a clear and unique Māori built environment tradition exists.

  • Project commenced:

    This research explored Māori views and access to Assisted Human Reproduction (AHR). The researchers carried out a series of interviews with key stakeholders to identify key themes, and a number of hui were run to ascertain broader Māori views towards infertility, use of AHR, AHR policy and legislative change, and the interface between tikanga Māori and various ethical scenarios that have emerged in the field of AHR.

    Outputs

COPYRIGHT © 2021 NGĀ PAE O TE MĀRAMATANGA, A CENTRE OF RESEARCH EXCELLENCE HOSTED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND