Mauri Ora - Human Flourishing

Professor Tania Ka'ai

Ngāti Porou, Ngāi Tahu, Hawaiian, Cook Islands, Samoan
Professor
Auckland University of Technology (AUT)

Professor Tania Ka‘ai has worked in tertiary education for over 20 years. As an Indigenous scholar Professor Ka‘ai uses the cultural values transmitted to her by her elders and mentors as an epistemological framework which informs her own academic writing and teaching (including supervision) within the university academy.

Her work as Director of Te Ipukarea and Te Whare o Rongomaurikura, provides an opportunity to share her knowledge not only with students and staff at AUT and others nationally, but internationally too.

Dr Rachel Wolfgramm

Te Aupouri, Ngāi Takoto, Whakatōhea, Ngāti Patumoana, Tonga
Senior Lecturer
University of Auckland

Rachel's training has been multi-disciplinary, incorporating the fields of organisation, consumption, leadership and economic theory and practice. She has taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Management, Organisation Behaviour, Māori Enterprise, Sustainability, Business, Culture and Society, Business Ethics and Sustainability.

Dr Robert Joseph

Ngāti Raukawa ki Wharepuhunga, Te Pae o Raukawa, Ngäti Paretekawa o Ngāti Maniapoto
Senior Lecturer
University of Waikato

Robert is a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand and was a senior research fellow for the Te Mātāhauariki Research Institute at the University of Waikato under the leadership of Judge Michael Brown and Dr Alex Frame. Dr Robert Joseph was the second Māori in New Zealand - and the first Māori male - to graduate with a PhD in Law in 2006.

Bridget Robson

Ngāti Raukawa
Associate Dean Māori; Director TRRHAEP; Senior Research Fellow
University of Otago

Bridget (Ngāti Raukawa) is the director of Te Rōpū Rangahau Hauora a Eru Pōmare at the University of Otago, Wellington. Her research interests are in the areas of social and economic determinants of health, inequitable treatment in the health system, the impact of racism on health, and the development of kaupapa Māori epidemiology.

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