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Celebrating 20 years of being Aotearoa New Zealand’s only Indigenous Centre of Research Excellence, Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) are excited to invite you to join us online from 15 – 18 November 2022 for our 2nd virtual and 10th International Indigenous Research Conference (IIRC).

  • Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga is pleased to announce its scholarships for research methods and skills via the New Zealand Social Statistics Network (NZSSN) Winter Programme 2011.

  • Sir Tīpene O’Regan has been honoured as a University of Auckland Fellow in recognition of his contribution to The University, particularly for his work as Chair of the Board of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga.

  • LOOKING TO THE FAR HORIZON: ARCHITECTS OF A NEW FUTURE

    2010 has yet again been a busy year in the life of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga and here we present the breadth and range of research and activities undertaken, hosted and supported by our Centre over the year. While addressing needs in our communities now, we are also looking firmly to the future, to the far horizon, and supporting research and activities that will transform the research discipline, our communities and society in general.

  • Addictions are now epidemic in New Zealand society and the lifestyles of Māori modelled on non-Māori is now creating considerable health issues in whānau. Results of an exploratory study on the impact of gambling on Māori will be presented in relation to the need for Whānau Ora to be a bipartisan policy and programme for at least a decade or more to address intergenerational trauma.

  • A Special Issue of MAI Review, Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga’s open access scholarly journal, entitled: Community Research Engagement with take place at the Fale Pasifika, University of Auckland. An overview of this Journal Issues contents is well described by the following abstract:

    Researching with Whānau Collectives
    Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy

  • Just as there is no global economic justice without cognitive social justice, equally there can be no equity within academia without cognitive equity. However, indigenous knowledge remains inequitably positioned within the academy yet in this great transitional moment, indigenous knowledge is more critically relevant than perhaps ever before.

  • Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga will this week launch Te Pae Tawhiti: Māori Economic Development, a major research initiative that aims to optimise Māori economic performance and growth. The Honourable Georgina te Heuheu, Associate Minister of Māori Affairs, will launch Te Pae Tawhiti and the Honourable Pita Sharples, Minister of Māori Affairs, will speak at the launch.

  • The most important response to the post-war period changes in Central America, to the exhaustion of testimonio and to the hybrid contradictions of representation of the subaltern subject by the Mestizo letrado, is given by Maya literature. Maya literature is a notable effort because of both its bilingualism and its representation of a uniquely different gaze on the Americas as a whole. It is also a renaissance of one of the great cultures of the Americas.

  • For many years indigenous or traditional Māori knowledge (mātauranga) has been considered incompatible with Western empirical based science, mainly because of the inclusion of holistic and spiritual components in the former. Increasingly the parallels between the two are being recognised and both scientists and holders of mātauranga are beginning to work with each other. The integration of mātauranga and Western science has to start with an acknowledgment that both are valid.

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